Wednesday, 8 August 2012

Full Mash - Hoxton Bonnet

The Full Mash Brewery of Stapleford, Nottingham are a small brewery fueled with a passion for real ale and an incentive for “doing things right.” Karl Waring began brewing in 1994 with a brewing kit constructed to brew using all grain known as the full mash method. Whenever Karl was introduced as a brewer the question asked was “what, full mash?” The name stuck. First as The Full Mash Brewery Then becoming Full Mash Brewery to the present day known as Full Mash. Commercial brewing began in 2003 using the original home brewing kit producing only one 9gal cask per brew. A 1brl kit was constructed to maintain orders and quickly grew into a 2brl brewery, operating 4 times a week. A 4brl brewery is currently in operation producing a range of ales from the core beer range through to seasonal specials, one off specials and a regular house beer.

Hoxton Bonnet is a very pleasing ale, balanced if a little bit wheaty with a nice citrus twist. Mildly bitter and a true beer coloured pale amber ale hoxton is a respectable session ale with a 4.2% ABV. Its an easy drink that quenches the thirst nicely, not sweet, not dry. Hoxton Bonnet is soon to be available as a bottle conditioned ale as well as the already available draught ale and is a popular choice at beer festivals.

What is that man wearing? Apart from a pair of very fetching spectacles, he dons a Hoxton Bonnet or silly hat. The focus of a craze started in London and fuelled on BBC Radio 6 by Radcliffe and Maconie, the Hoxton Bonnet is the kind of hat you can find for sale on markets all over the country. Sometimes they are knitted with side flaps and tassles or pompoms...

Tuesday, 31 July 2012

Buy Two Cases of Everards Bottled Ales and Get a FREE T-Shirt

Here's a fantastic online case offer from Everards Brewery. To celebrate their recent awards across their range of bottled ales, for a limited time get a free t-shirt or polo-shirt when you purchase two cases of the same brand of Everards Ale online

Offer valid from 20th July - 19th August 2012

Don't know what to do with a case of Tiger? Get cooking of course. Choose from one of the fabulous winning Tiger Hero Recipes from Everards recent competition to find their Tiger Hero Recipe Masterchef of 2012


Here's the winning recipe.


Fillet of Beef with Tiger Beef sauce


Ingredients

Tiger beef sauce
  • 1×500ml bottle Tiger Best Bitter
  • 450ml good beef stock
  • 1 med. carrot diced
  • 1 crushed garlic clove
  • 1/2 stick celery diced
  • 1/2 med. onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • Butter & flour
  • 4 x fillet steaks cut and trimmed 8cm across x 4cm deep
  • Olive oil 1tbl spoon
  • crouton bread cut same size as steak 1.5cm thick
  • stilton pate
  • 50g of good local stilton
  • 50g cream cheese
Potato Pave
  • 1kg of maris piper potatoes
  • 200g sweet potato
  • 300ml double cream
  • 1x crushed garlic
  • 1x bay leaf
  • 1x pinch nutmeg
Mixed Veg
  • Trimmed carrots
  • French green beans
  • Celery cut julienne

Instructions

To make Potato Pave (Try to cook this the day before)
1) Gently boil the cream add the crushed garlic bay leaf and a pinch of nutmeg just for a few minutes then set aside.
2) Peel the potato including the sweet and finely slice.
3) Get a square or oblong dish big enough for at least 4 portions at 4 – 5cm deep,
line with butter then line with foil and butter foil.
4) Mix the sliced potato in the cream mixture to coat then layer out in the dish seasoning as the layers build with a layer of sweet potato through the middle, foil over the top place in oven with heavy object to weight down cook for 1 1/2 hours at 180c.
5) Allow to cool, Refrigerate for 4 hours, turn out and remove foil and cut into neat portions.Set aside.
To make Tiger Beef sauce
1) Add all ingredients in pan ( excluding butter and flour )boil until reduced by half turn off heat.
2) Put the prepared veg on to boil
3) Heat frying pan with metal handle on high heat
4) Use olive oil direct on to steaks with seasoning,put straight into pan 2 mins each side, then put pan into oven at 220 c for 10 – 15 mins depending rare to med
5) Put sliced potato in oven as steak is cooking to warm through.
6) Remove steak put on plate to rest,
7) Put pan on low heat and use as much tiger beef mixture as required and roll knob of butter with flour and then add in to sauce to thicken.
To make croutons
1) mix together stilton and cream cheese to a smooth mixture.
2) Then fry bread in butter, take care not to burn
To serve the dish
1) Set out warm plates and put crouton on topped with stilton pate
2) Put a portion of potato on each plate and vegetables on side
3)Place steak on crouton, with the all Important Tiger Beef sauce over the steak to finish and enjoy!

Monday, 30 July 2012

Belgian Beer - The History and Background of the Beers of Belgium


Hoegaarden White Beer
In Belgium today there are 125 breweries which are able to produce 500 different kinds of Belgian Beer. Beer has been brewed in Belgium since the Middle Ages when originally it was produced in monasteries only. However today this is a country where the most varieties of beer are brewed and can be drunk.

The alcohol content of these particular beers is considerably higher than some of the other varieties available in Europe and in some cases it reaches a level of between 6 and 8 percent. Breweries were forced into making higher alcohol content beers because a law was passed stating that spirits (which beer was classed as) could not be drunk in public houses. However, although this law stood for many years it was finally rescinded back in 1983.

As we have already mentioned there are 500 different kinds of Belgian beer being brewed in Belgium today and they fall into a number of different categories. In this article we take a look at what these different types of beer are.

Chimay Trappist Beer
Trappist Beer - Only beer that is brewed in one of 6 monasteries in Belgium can be classified as being this type of beer. The whole process of brewing the beer should have either been overseen or carried out by the Trappist monks who reside at the monastery where beer is produced. Each bottle of beer that is brewed comes with a label on it clearly indicating that it is the genuine Trappist product and that monastery has complied with rules decreed by the International Trappist Association.

Lambic Beer - Is a very unique beer to Belgium and wild yeasts grown in abundance near Brussels are used in its fermentation process. The actual time that it takes for this beer to ferment is considerably longer than many others. Some forms of this beer the fermentation process lasts between 3 and 6 months and others it as long as 2 to 3 years. It is this fermentation process which provides this particular variety of beer with its very distinctive flavor, which some people may dislike. It is very dry, vinous and cidery which results in it having a somewhat sour aftertaste.

Fruit Beers - These are made using Lambic beer and will contain either a fruit concentrate or fresh fruit in them. The most commonly produced and drunk of the fruit beers is Kriek which contains cherries, but there are many other varieties including those made using blackcurrants, raspberries and peaches. Once the fruit has been added to the Lambic beer a second fermentation process takes place.

White Beer - This particular Belgian beer is made using wheat hops and spices and will often contain orange peel and coriander. However, each beer that the various breweries around Belgium produce comes with its own distinctive flavor and this will be down to the ingredients and brewing methods used.
There are a wide range of different types of Belgian Beer available to buy online, many of the popular beers are mentioned above such as Blond Beer and Fruit Beer. Trappist Beer is also very popular amongst beer loves throughout Europe.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Patrick_Anthony

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1318613

Moorhouses Pendle Witches Brew

Moorhouse's is an independent brewery founded in 1865 by William Moorhouse in Burnley in Lancashire, UK as a producer of mineral waters and low alcohol beers known as hop bitters. It first produced cask ales in 1978 and has maintained long held connections with the local legend of the Pendle Witches. The trials of the Pendle witches in 1612 are among the most famous witch trials in English history, and some of the best recorded of the 17th century. The twelve accused lived in the area around Pendle Hill in Lancashire, and were charged with the murders of ten people by the use of witchcraft. All but two were tried at Lancaster Assizes on 18–19 August 1612, along with the Samlesbury witches and others, in a series of trials that have become known as the Lancashire witch trials. One was tried at York Assizes on 27 July 1612, and another died in prison. Of the eleven who went to trial – nine women and two men – ten were found guilty and executed by hanging; one was found not guilty.

Moorhouses now boast six pubs including The Pendle Witch at Atherton, five permanent cask ales, twelve seasonal ales plus bottled and speciality blends. They are currently running a campaign to pardon the Pendle Witches to mark the 400th year anniversary of their execution. 

Even if supporting long gone witches isn't your thing you can still enjoy one of their flagship ales Pendle Witches Brew. This chestnut coloured sweet malty ale has plenty of character in its auburn depths. Raisin, nuts and red wine come together with mulled winter citrus fruits with a hint of bitterness at the back. A smooth mouthfeel and a small creamy head make this 5.1% ABV ale a popular choice in any pub proving that witches aren't just for Halloween.
 

Saturday, 28 July 2012

The Hartlebury Brewery - Attwoods Pale Ale

The Hartlebury Brewery is an Independently owned Brewery founded by professional businessman and entrepreneur Gary Attwood in 2011. Gary has used his invaluable business experience along with his passion for the brewing trade to create a purpose built facility, located in the village of Hartlebury, Worcestershire.Their four main brews are Attwoods Pale Ale or APA (4.0& ABV), Nectar (4.2% ABV), O'Ryan's Bitter (5.0& ABV) and Farmer's Dark Ale (3.7% ABV) named after the head brewer John Farmer.

Newly released their crisp, light and refreshing Attwoods Pale Ale has been traditionally brewed using a careful blend of finest English hops and American cascade, resulting in a clean bitterness and delicious hop aroma to thirst for more. Floral notes of heather blend with mild toffee and fudge undertones to create this brilliant summer quencher. Straw coloured with a white, light and fluffy head Attwoods Pale laces intricately with a subtle haze on the eye. A nice light session ale with a 4.0% ABV.

Thursday, 26 July 2012

Does Tradition Hold You Back When You Look To Buy Beer Online?

I'm always surprised that more people do not consider the option to get their beer in a more convenient way. After all it is a bulky substance, and carry it home or even to your car must be at least a slight inconvenience. However, there are practical concerns, and even some traditional reasons for the conservative nature to using the Internet for obtaining your ale.
Real ale and bitter has always been very much intertwined with tradition. Dating back almost 400 years, the first breweries would definitely have delivered beer to the farmhands directly.
It is a mistake to think of the typical medieval British town or village as having a local tavern. It may well have a resting stop for horses and somewhere to get food, but it is very unlikely that these places would serve any type of alcoholic beverage.
Early beers were brewed by local farmers, and most were given as part of the lunch to farmhands and other outdoor workers. There was no tradition of sitting round a table and sipping a drink.
So in a way, the idea of having beer delivered to you rather than the other way round is the real traditional way of looking at things. And when you decide to buy beer online, you could argue you are simply being a traditionalist.
Yes, I appreciate that rather a tentative way to look at things, but it does counter the argument that many from the real ale brigade have against ordering your drinks online.
Perhaps a more practical reason not to buy beer online is that many do not like the taste of their drinks when they have been sealed in a metal or aluminium can. To the real ale connoisseur, the thought of drinking out of a metal container is heresy.
To counter this, a good brewery will produce ale is in glass bottles. Scientifically, glass will not taint any substance put in it, it'll taste exactly as it should do. It will only retain any aftertaste that it has picked up from the cask during the brewing and storing process.
However, despite this, there are yet more people who will argue against the idea of buying their Christmas beer online. Or indeed getting their ale online any time of year.
Arguments such as the risk of glass breaking, the reluctance of delivery services to leave alcohol on your doorstep should you not be in, and the possible demise of the traditional public house should everybody begin to drink at home are all cited as reasons for avoiding the Internet when ordering any alcoholic drinks.
I like to think I am slightly more pragmatic than this. At my house we entertain many guests over the Christmas and New Year period, and during the summer we have barbecues and parties. It is uncommon for a weekend to go by without us having some visitors, and I always like to be able to offer them a glass or can of beer.
To make sure I never run out, I simply buy beer online. It's always there, it gets delivered within 24 hours, and it's cheaper.
I'm sure many traditionalists will still argue with me, and some will twist their beards in anxiety at the thought of more and more people drinking at home. But it is just a practical and sensible way to proceed, as well as saving me a lot of money and hassle in the process.
If you want to take the plunge and buy beer online, then why not give Sadler's Ales a go. A traditional brewery that sell to the public
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Paul_Rone-Clarke

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5366716

Titanic - Chocolate & Vanilla Stout

Titanic Brewery is rightly renowned for their Stout. Having won many awards over the years for a genuine dry stout this beer offers a delightfully sweeter alternative at a not too heavy 4.5% ABV. Brewed using Roast Barley and Maris Otter Pale Malt which give a huge amount of rich body to the beer and a generous amount of English North Down hops to create a bitter edge, the sweetness comes from the addition of Chocolate and Madagascan Vanilla. It is so rich and opulent that it seems like a pint and a half in one glass!

Madagascan Vanilla Orchid Flower and Pods
Vanilla is the fruit of an orchid plant, which grows in the form of a bean pod. Although there are over 110 varieties of vanilla orchids, only one, Vanilla planifolia, produces the fruit which gives us 99% of commercial vanilla. Another genus, the Vanilla tahitensis grown in Tahiti, does produce fruit with a more pronounced aroma, but debatedly less flavor. 

Of all the Vanilla Species Madagascar Bourbon (planifolia) is the most common bean used in extracts. Bourbon beans from Madagascar and the Comoros are described as having a creamy, hay-like, and sweet aroma, with strong vanillin overtones.

Attractive enough with its off-white head and deep black appearance the chocolate was sadly all but hidden beneath a very heavy hit of vanilla, this occasional brew from Titanic was a little sharp and aggressive on the palate for my taste. It should taste of nougat and cheesecake with a bitter nutty finish but instead the flavour was cloying and a little plastic for this stout to achieve any acclaim.

The Great British Beer Festival is Great Fun on a Hostel Break to the Capital

The summer is a brilliant time to visit the capital as it is during the warmer months that the city comes alive with various festivals and events.
This August, why not check out the wide range of hostels in London available and enjoy yourself at the annual Great British Beer Festival? Celebrating all things malt and hops, this large scale event is a true beer fan's dream.
Due to kick off on August 7th and run for four days, the event - which is put on by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) - will boast stalls and exhibitions from all the biggest names in the industry, from JD Wetherspoon to Greene King, Marston's, Theakston's and Thwaites.
Head to the festival on August 9th to take advantage of the event's Hat Day. Fun loving beer fans are asked to make and decorate their own crazy hat for this special day, with the best headwear going on display in a parade.
The person who the judges feel has the best hat will win a goody bag filled with CAMRA products and beer-themed items.
Some 800 different types of beer, real ale and cider will be on tap for visitors to try and those who love complementing their pint with various bar snacks will not be disappointed by the wide range of pub grub and traditional drinking food on offer.
As the Great British Beer Festival is held at one of the best known venues in London, Olympia exhibition centre and conference centre in West Kensington, you are sure to find cheap accommodation such as a great value hostel nearby. The tube system is easy to negotiate and also offers good value for money on getting around, so you are sure to easily find the event.
As well as being a fun day out for those who enjoy a tipple or two in their local at the weekend, the event is also worth a visit by those who take their drinking rather more seriously.
Real ale and beer experts will be on hand at a number of beer tasting events, which could be ideal for those who fancy learning more about the ingredients which can be found and tasted in their favourite alcoholic beverage.
The summer months are the perfect time to check out the range of hostels in London and have a great time - why not look into cheap accommodation near to famous venue Olympia, which is hosting the brilliant Great British Beer Festival this August?
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dipika_Patel

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4635490

Tuesday, 24 July 2012

Oakham Ales - Water of Forgetfulness



In Greek mythology, Lethe was one of the five rivers of Hades. Also known as the Ameles Potamos (river of unmindfulness), the Lethe flowed around the cave of Hypnos and through the Underworld, where all those who drank from it's waters experienced complete forgetfulness. Lethe was also the name of the Greek spirit of forgetfulness and oblivion, with whom the river was often identified. Its a cracking name for a real ale although I am obliged to advise readers of this blog to be Drink Aware and try to avoid complete oblivion and settle for mild amnesia instead.

Oakham Ales' Oakademy of Excellence has done us proud with this light ale style beer with an equally light fluffy head. An easily quaffed, refreshing beer with plenty of passion fruit, lychee and orange citrus flavours Water of Forgetfulness has a dry slightly salty, lingering finish. Perhaps not as strongly hopped as other Oakham ales but pleasant nonetheless with a 4.1% ABV a good session ale brewed specially for the month of June.

Monday, 23 July 2012

Movie Madness Part 2 - Salamander Jelly Dolly

Moving on from Salamander's Stardust we have the intriguing Jelly Dolly. Named after the 2004 Arthouse horror film of the same name the pump clip sports a still featuring Rachael Walton in her one and only movie appearance to date. Here's the gist...
Audrey is troubled. Everything is great....she and Henry love each other, they live in a nice house, they're a happy young couple, except now she ca hardly stand the sight of him let alone allow him to touch her. What went wrong? It wasn't meant to be like this. Audrey knows she's changed. Deep inside she knows she should make a clean break but that would mean turning her life upside down-being alone. So she carries on as ever hoping her feelings will change. Her mind is plagued by dark dreams-weird sex with her best friends new boyfriend, taunted by a lunatic friend called Crevice. As Audrey struggles to keep her night-time horrors at bay they start to creep in to her reality and invade her waking hours. She develops a hideous mutation of the belly button; a small orange plastic ring grows at her naval attached to a piece of string which disappears in to her stomach. What involuntary words will she utter if the string is pulled? Will her own body betray her? Audrey must take control of her life before she is consumed by the dark world that runs parallel to her reality and she is forced to do something unspeakable . Or maybe she's just having a breakdown? It's a story for anyone who has ever ended a relationship or gone a little crazy. And you won't have seen one quite like this before.
Regardless of this strange conection to a most obscure film Jelly Dolly really is a great ale. Sweet as the name suggests like sweets and very moreish it makes for a great summer brew. At 4.3% ABV its not too strong for a session but I think it drinks a little above this strength on a hot summer's day.

Monday, 16 July 2012

Movie Madness Part 1 - Salamander Stardust Stout

I didn't get the connection at first while trying to decide if I liked the latest stout offering by the Salamander Brewing Co. Why stardust? Turns out its a film, more of which I will elaborate later.

Stardust Stout is a well made, well balanced deep rich flavorsome brew that drinks a little under its 4.5% ABV but haven't we seen this before from so many other breweries? Maybe I'm getting jaded, stout in summer is after all a little bit of a failed concept from the outset, pale and well hopped sunshine pales seem more in order but I am a die hard stout/porter fan and the lack of sunshine this year hasn't kicked my pale ale butt into gear yet.

Salamander have always been an enigma, strange names and otherworldy flavours making a heady combination attracting a variety of drinkers to sample their wares. Startdust Stout doesn't fit their norm flavor-wise, quite ordinary in comparison to something like Squonk and I am left pondering the movie connection with this other Stardust [DVD] starring Michelle Pfeiffer, maybe the brewer is a fan.
An adaptation of the Neil Gaiman novel of the same name, Stardust brings a strong cast together for an enjoyable family feast, with plenty to enjoy.
Stardust mixes in romance and adventure, all in a fantasy movie guise, as it follows Tristan on his quest to retrieve a fallen star for the beautiful Victoria. Only it soon becomes clear that there’s a lot more going on as Tristan makes his journey (not least a companion more diverting than the aforementioned Victoria). Michelle Pfeiffer, for instance, returns to high profile movie making (after quite a break) in the role of the evil witch, while there’s space too for Robert De Niro’s pirate and an odd cameo from Ricky Gervais.
Seemingly one of a wealth of family films that made it out of the blocks off the success of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, Stardust doesn’t quite hit those heights, but it has quite a sporting go. It’s an uneven tale, albeit one told with enough passion and enthusiasm to encourage you to cut it some slack. And when it gets to the end of the last reel, it’s hard to feel shortchanged by what you’ve just seen.

What does Stardust taste like? Deeply Sweet and enticing on first sip changing to a more serious bitter dry taste as it goes down the glass and the roasted malts play their part. An oaty finish with a hint of golden syrup at the back.

Saturday, 10 March 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 6 The Ultimate Guide To Thornbridge Ales

A guide to the wonderful delights from the Thornbridge brewery....in case we need help deciding which one to try.


Wednesday, 7 March 2012

Sambrooks Junction Ale

I never thought it could happen with me and the ale from Clapham....well Battersea in reality but Clapham isn't a million miles away from Sambrooks Brewery.

Junction Ale is Sambrooks anniversary ale and is one of only three ales brewed by Sambrooks - Wandle and Powerhouse Porter being the other two. Being close to the UK’s busiest railway station Duncan Sambrook (a former city accountant) decided people needed another reason to go ‘Up the Junction’ and Junction Ale was born. In style it is very different to Wandle and was brewed in tribute to a good friend of his who often complained about ‘too much flowery aromas in beers these days!’


Junction is brewed as a traditional English bitter, using only English hop varieties, lots of crystal malt and a touch of roasted barley to give it an inviting auburn colour. Great with a steak pie or a roast dinner, Junction is a fine compliment to Wandle Ale, but loses none of its drinkability. Just treat it with a bit of respect, at 4.5% it is a little bit stronger than Wandle.
The man himself - Duncan Sambrook

Tasting Notes: A darker amber than is usual in a bitter with a good deep cream head. Chalky raisins on the nose meets bread and butter pudding on the palate with a milky mouthfeel creating a lingering taste experience. A little savoury brine on the finish, sharp and tangy with crushed caramel and ginger cream cookie notes. A little spikey like darjeeling tea.
  • 4.5% ABV

Tuesday, 6 March 2012

The Hop, The Whole Hop and Nothing But The Hop - McMullen Original IPA

Founded in 1827 in Railway Street, Hertford McMullens  first moved to Mill Bridge in 1832 and then made a second move to Old Cross in 1891, later investing in a modern brewhouse in 1984. By the mid 2000s the company  narrowly escape closure as shareholders who wanted to receive a reasonable dividend and those who wanted to reinvest annual profits into the company split. David McMullen stepped down as Chairman following an unsuccessful management buyout. Independent Chairman, Charles Brims was appointed and he facilitated a compromise whereby several non-brewing property investments were sold to release cash to appease the majority shareholders and a plan was launched to build a brand new, smaller brewhouse. The company decided to shed contract-brewing and take advantage of tax breaks by becoming a smaller brewer and re-opened as the new 'Whole Hop Brewery' in 2006.
Whole Hops
Unlike many other brewers McMullen's latest brewery continues to use whole natural hops straight from the sack which is why It Is called 'The Whole Hop Brewery'. They do not believe that using processed pellets or hop extracts are good for the image of traditional and authentic brewers of fine cask ales. McMullen know their hop growers, most of whom grow classic varieties in the garden counties of England. However, not afraid to travel in the interests of good taste, they also work with farmers in Slovenia who grow just the right Styrian Goldings for their new beer, McMullen Cask Ale.

Tasting Notes: Brewed to the classic McMullen recipe using the finest whole flower hops and specially kilned amber malt to give it its deep rich flavours, McMullen Original IPA isn't the usual pale yellow IPA we are used to seeing. In fact it is indeed a rusty orange deep amber with a pale cream head. This dark IPA also boasts a very complex hop aroma of peach melba and aniseed. On first tasting sunflower seeds mingle with liquorice (imagine eating black jacks with fruit salad sweets for the aroma and flavour combined) and this turns to toasted caramel and brazil nut down the glass lacing beautifully in concentric rings with a slightly cloying bitter finish.
  • ABV 4.8%

Thursday, 1 March 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 5 Beer Flavour Wheel

What flavour is that ale?

Beer flavour!


Tuesday, 28 February 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 4 How To Make Beer

As if we needed to know, really.

Image Source: Bon Expose

Monday, 27 February 2012

Sharp's Doom Bar

Sharp's Doom Bar, named after the infamous sandbank at the mouth of the Camel Estuary in North Cornwall is a nicely balanced dark amber ale made from only four natural ingredients - cornish water, UK malted barley, whole flower hops and sharp's unique yeast. Clearly the whole hop flowers give Doom Bar a distinct taste and aroma which sets it above many similar looking ales and on the first sip the palate is instantly hit with a clean, sharp and refreshing flavour. Dry and as bitter as its rusty orange translucence suggests with lemon and grapefruit citrus highlights, Doom Bar hits the palate with deeper cream soda notes as it goes down the glass and it laces beautifully with a Garibaldi biscuit and coffee finish. At 4.0% ABV this is an easy session ale that may seem weak at first but gathers flavour and interest as more is savoured. 


Image: Jeff Van Campen
Taste Notes Stuart Howe Head Brewer

“The aroma of Doom Bar combines an accomplished balance of spicy resinous hop, inviting sweet malt and delicate roasted notes. The mouth feel is a perfectly balanced and complex blend of succulent dried fruit, lightly roasted malty notes and a subtle yet assertive bitterness. The bitterness remains into the finish with dry fruity notes which implore the drinker to go back for more.”

What exactly is a Doom Bar?

The Doom Bar is a bank of sand at the estuary of the River Camel where it meets the Celtic Sea on Cornwall's north coast. A sand bank, centuries old, the Doom Bar protects and calms this beautiful estuary. Sailors respect the Doom Bar knowing it to be unforgiving if met with haste or arrogance. It represents a significant hazard to shipping, and there have been many ships wrecked there through the centuries. It became so notorious that many vessels would risk being wrecked on the coast rather than negotiate the entrance to Padstow.

The good news is Doom Bar is not only the best selling cask conditioned beer for pub chain Punch Taverns but also a recognised national brand due to its purchase by Molson Coors in 2011. While large corporate buyouts of this nature are anathema to the hardened real ale drinker it will mean Doom Bar will be on offer in more pubs across the country a welcome sight to most I am sure.

Sunday, 26 February 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 3 Beer Cocktails

Nothing new about beer cocktails, I've been mixing it up with black velvets and black 'n tans for years. Pint of 'mix' anyone?


Tuesday, 14 February 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 2 The Very Many Varieties of Beer

I like this poster, wonderfully diagrammatic. It really does float my hop.

Monday, 13 February 2012

Beer In Pictures - Number 1 What Should I Drink?

I'm too hungover to write this week so I'm introducing a 7 day series of beer related graphics I have randomly found on the intertubes. this one is particularly stunning because its a flow chart. I do so love flow charts.


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